Posted by in Gear Categories: Photography.

Sure, a strong telephoto lens gets you those great feline whisker snaps, but what’s a close up without stability? A bad shot.

 
Also read: The 6 wildlife photo tips you need to shoot like a pro

 

Bush Bag

R620, ormsdirect.co.za

Bush Bag

The best way to keep your camera stable is with a tripod, but these are difficult to operate from inside a vehicle (remember: vibrations from the engine affect your photographs so as soon as you are parked in the perfect spot, switch off). Beanbags are an excellent alternative for supporting your camera in a confined space. Some have a mounting plate that slides onto the window, but the Bush Bag has a contoured underside so it sits neatly and solidly on the door and, at 22cm is wide enough to accommodate the girth of most wildlife camera lenses.

There’s also a rubberised mesh for extra stability and an adjustable elasticated strap to hold the camera lens firmly in place. The bag is filled with lightweight polystyrene foam, so it packs well. It also has a hardy non-slip canvas surface and durable rubber piping to ensures stitching lasts.

 

A cheaper option

Buy a one-kilogram bag of red speckled beans or a two-kilogram bag of rice, place it over the window and rest your camera on it. As a last resort, use the jacket or pillow that’s lurking on your backseat.

 
Also read: 5 fatal photo errors (and how to avoid them)