Posted by in Gear Categories: Camping and Photography.

Use a basic DSLR to experiment with night-sky photography.

 

By Dewald Tromp

By Dewald Tromp

 

Exposure settings

Play with long exposures to capture light from the stars. Set your shutter speed between 15 and 20 seconds – anything longer will create the star-trail effect – and a wide aperture (f2.8 to f5.6). Take a test shot and adjust the ISO to balance the exposure.

 

By Jaro Vomacka

By Jaro Vomacka

 

Prevent camera shake

Use a tripod for sharp images and further prevent blurring by using a shutter release cable. If you don’t own one, you can use the self-timer.

 

By James Campbell

By James Campbell

 

Focus

Use manual focus to set up your shot as most DSLRs will struggle to autofocus without light. Otherwise, use a torch to light up a subject such as a tree or building, which will also create a more interesting image and give the camera something on which to auto-focus.

 

By Emil von Maltitz

By Emil von Maltitz


Then switch to manual focus to take the snap. It’s trial and error until you get it right, but the eventual result of a striking baobab in front of the Milky Way is worth it.

 

White balance

The Milky Way often looks too warm in photographs (stars look yellow instead of white). Set your white balance to tungsten instead of daylight for better results.

 

By Isak Pretorius

By Isak Pretorius


All photographs were submitted to Getaway Gallery – see more magnificent night sky photography here

 
Interested in the night sky? Click here for all the gear you need to start star gazing. 

 




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