Serbia: Europe’s secret wine country

Posted by Imogen Searra on 28 May 2020

When one thinks of Europe and wine, the mind automatically jumps to France and Italy. The wines produced in these countries are world famous and rightfully so.

What some may not know is that though the Serbian wine regions are not as distinguished as the countries with developed wine industries, the country has fast become a contender in the wine-making game.

The country’s main viticultural areas, according to Wine Searcher, roughly follow the Velika Morava river toward its confluence with Danube, approximately 120km north of its origin in Stalac which is in central Serbia.

The Velika Morava is often confused with the Morava river that originates in Moravia in the Czech Republic. This river flows into Danube to the west of Bratislava in western Slovakia.

Around 65% of the vines planted are white grapes and the rest are red grapes, according to The Manual. The most planted grape is called Smederevka, which is blended with Laski Riesling, according to Wine Searcher. Other native grapes include Prokupac, used to create rosé and Mézes Fehér, a sweeter white.

The more commercial white grapes including Cabernet, Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc and Sauvignon Blanc as well as Gamay, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Pinot Noir are all grown here too.

Serbian Wine Guide outlines the following areas as the best for wine tourism:

In autumn, specifically in September, there are a number of wine festivals. One such festival is dedicated to the local grape variety Smederevka. The Smederevo Autumn Festival takes place from the 6th to the 8th of September and the festivities are both fun and educational.

 

Image credit: Instagram/ serbiatourism






yoast-primary - 1004403
tcat - Destinations
tcat_slug - destinations-travel-ideas
tcat2 - Food
tcat2_slug - food
tcat_final -