What lies beneath… Europe’s past unearthed

Tomas Sentpetery, a London based photographer, has captured some of Europe’s most frequented sites and what lies beneath the surface. Bringing new perspective to cityscapes, his photographs document places for visitors looking to experience something a little different in Europe’s major cities.

 

Paris – The Eiffel Tower above the Catacombs of Paris

 

Paris Musées’ Les Catacombes de Paris were built to relieve the city’s overcrowded cemeteries and have the remains of over six million Parisians. Like the Eiffel Tower, the Catacombes are open for walking tours to the general public.

 

London – Big Ben above the abandoned Aldwych underground station

The abandoned station is beneath King’s College in London. Since its closure in 1994, the station is used by organisations like the fire department and the police for training purposes. It is also accessible for the public for tours from the museum.

 

Naples – The Bourbon Tunnels that lie beneath the region

The Bourbon Tunnels are an ancient underground escape route from the Palazzo Reale but were left unfinished. During World War II the tunnels became a bomb shelter and military hospital.

 

Poland – The Wieliczka salt mines are located near Krakow

In one of Poland’s largest tourist attractions within the Kraków metropolitan area you will find the Wielicza salt mines. The mine produced table salt until 2007 and reaches a depth of 327 metres. Civilians and tourists are welcome to tour the mines.

 

London – The St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel lies above London Postal Museum’s disused Rail Mail

The London Post Office Railway operated from 1927 to 2003 before it was declared too expensive to run (£1.2 million a day). Since then, the Mail Rail has been converted into a museum.

 

Spain: Locals live in the caves of Barrio de Cuevas in Guadix

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The largest cave complex in Europe can be found in the Barrio de Cuevas in Guadix. Locals are known as trogloditas and have been residing in the caves for centuries.