‘Capturing Ecology’ photo competition winners announced

Posted by Elise Kirsten on 4 December 2019

The British Ecological Society runs an annual photographic competition for photos taken by ecologists or students across the world. This year’s winners of its ‘Capturing Ecology’ competition were announced on 29 November.

The overall winner was an image of a Malagasy tree boa snake wrapped around a branch of a tree, taken by Roberto García Roa.

Roberto García Roa won the overall award for this photograph of a Malagasy tree boa Image credit: Roberto García Roa and the British Ecological Society

Speaking about the photo, Roberto, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Valencia, said, ‘Unfortunately, many areas of Madagascar are suffering huge anthropic pressures including poaching and fires, and big snakes are becoming increasingly difficult to see. During my visit to Madagascar, I had the pleasure of finding this outstanding snake and photographing it. To offer a dramatic scenario reflecting the conditions that these snakes are suffering, I used an external red light as a source of light and severe blurring to capture the environment.’

Andrew Whitworth took the People and Nature award for this image of a female three-toed sloth crossing a road. Image credit: Andrew Whitworth and the British Ecological Society

According to a statement by the British Ecological Society, ‘The winning images and an additional 15 highly commended images, taken by international ecologists and students, celebrate the diversity of ecology; capturing flora and fauna from across the planet. Subjects range from the hypnotic textures of a birch forest, to a three-toed sloth making its way across a road, to a Southern white rhinoceros receiving its annual horn trimming to help protect it from poachers.’

The society announced Nilanjan Chatterjee, who is studying for a PhD at the Wildlife Institute of India, as the overall student winner. Nilanjan’s image ‘Flames in flumes’ shows a male plumbeous water-redstart preying on insects as they emerge from the water.

The overall student winner was Nilanjan Chatterjee with this shot of a male plumbeous water-redstart preying on insects Image credit: Nilanjan Chatterjee and the British Ecological Society

The overall winner, Roberto García Roa also took third place in the ‘Up Close and Personal’ category for a photo of a scorpion under ultraviolet light. Image credit: Roberto García Roa and the British Ecological Society

Pablo Javier Merlo took the student award in the Dynamic Ecosystems category for this photo of a chimango resting on a cow, next to the Beagle Channel in the Andes Image credit: Pablo Javier Merlo and the British Ecological Society

Mikhail Kapychka was the overall runner up with this photo of autumnal birch trees, below.

Mikhail Kapychka was the overall runner up with this photo of autumnal birch trees Image credit: Mikhail Kapychka and the British Ecological Society

Peter Hudson was commended for this photo of a lioness with a warthog piglet in her jaws. Image credit: Peter Hudson and the British Ecological Society

Khristian V. Valencia took the student award in the Individuals and Populations category for this photo of a cloudy snake eyeing its prey. Image credit: Khristian V. Valencia and the British Ecological Society.






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